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Karen Hospital, my maternity facility of choice, is simply unbeatable!

Rosemary Mutuku – Interview by Katumbi Mbaluto

So many adages are used to describe what motherhood is. From “a calling” to a “God given role” and “a natural duty”, amongst many others. As we journey through life, we start to realise that things aren’t always as black and white as we think, and we do not live in a “one cup fits all” type of world. Parenthood just like so many other major junctures in life, is far beyond our control and design.

I had a sit down with Rosemary Mutuku, a lecturer at Strathmore University, as she shared her pregnancy journey and delivery experience at Karen Hospital.

“Well mine is literally that “blessings upon blessings galore” type of story. It’s actually the type of account that makes many a listener wonder if I’m narrating a Hollywood script. Basically, I met my prince charming and got married in what is (annoyingly) termed as “my later years.. (seriously society must take a chill pill)”. I met my now husband at the ripe age of 39, fell in love and got married within a year. Flash forward to less than a year later and I was pregnant with our first child. A literal “Love-Marry-Me with a baby carriage” situation.

My pregnancy was deemed a “medical marvel”… for real; not so much to do with my age, but the added factor that I was overweight; in fact I was obese at the time. I have always been that girl who dreamed of marriage, babies, a white picket fence with swing sets at my front lawn.

You can therefore imagine my heartache when doctors informed me of the impossibility of natural conception, prior to getting pregnant. This fact was hammered into me, such that my pregnancy came as a shock to everyone across the board, including my husband and I. We thanked God and still do everyday, and I realised in truth that no one knows the blueprint of your life, but God.

So….. after the shock, confusion, denial, happiness, panic and slight “deliriousness” passed (ladies, you know the emotional protocol), we quickly were brought crushing back down to earth with the reality that in being overweight, my pregnancy period would definitely be unique and unfortunately complicated. Doctors did not hesitate to paint a “worst case scenario” picture, in order for me to be fully prepared and aware of all probable outcomes. In the same token, they were supportive and confident in all going well, if medical orders were followed to the letter.

It therefore did not come as much of a surprise, when my doctor (Dr. Njoki), informed me that I must take leave from work and rest, just at the beginning of my second trimester. This was because I was at risk of high blood pressure. Aside from being an amazing and credible OB/GYN, Dr. Njoki is a no nonsense, assertive and firm professional (you don’t want to mess with her… just saying), and her directives are final. In hind-sight, my antenatal visits at Medanta Clinic were primarily a constant monitoring of my weight, blood pressure and water retention. My health and wellness and that of baby’s were the paramount focus; rather than the usual, tools, classes, guidelines and check ups that is the normative timetable of uncomplicated pregnancies.

It came as no surprise when Dr. Njoki informed us that I would deliver via caesarean section. I honestly did not mind how or what my delivery process would be, so long as my baby was born. A month prior to my EDD, Dr. Njoki moved from Medanta Clinic to Karen Hospital, as the Chief Hospital Administrator. Aside from the fact that I would have followed her to Mars if that were the case, Karen Hospital as a choice was and still is unbeatable as a maternity facility option. This is especially the case for complicated pregnancies, high risk pregnancies, and medical anomalies during labour and delivery. The Doctors, medical personnel and staff are extremely professional, experienced, and personal in carrying out care and treatment. The facilities are high-end and first class, giving one the added sense of security in as far as surgical and operational success is concerned.

On my exact EDD, I checked in and was admitted for my caesarean section. As the nurse administered the general anaesthesia, I held my husband’s hand and prayed that all would go well. I believed it would, as I started to go under and everything went from blurry to dark all around me.

I must have come to and gone back under a couple of times, before I was able to cognitively understand that I was in the HDU, in stable condition and that my baby was healthy and well, sleeping her morning away in the baby nursery. I really believe that the latter was all I needed to recover in no time, and found myself out of HDU, in my own room, in the maternity ward.

Nothing can describe the joy and thanksgiving as well as abundant love I felt when I finally (I was the last to do so indeed… but best for last right?) held my sweet baby girl Mwikali in my arms. She was (and still is) a perfect little miracle.

I can never stop encouraging all soon-to-be mums to choose Karen Hospital as their maternity facility option. Words cannot suffice in describing the phenomenal treatment I received there, or the wonderful little angel that God gifted me there, in the form of my very own heartbeat; Mwikali.

Rosemary’s Best Moments at Karen Hospital;
Ø Kind and Compassionate personnel
Ø Clean hospital!
Ø Professional doctors, nurses and personnel

Rosemary’s Areas of Improvement for Karen Hospital;
Ø None

Jackson’s (hubby’s) Best Moments at Karen Hospital;
Ø Organised nurses
Ø Hospital staff went out of their way to ensure Rosemary’s comfort
Ø Amazing at handling high risk pregnancies
Ø Great food, service and facilities

Jackson’s Areas of Improvement for Karen Hospital;
Ø None

Insurance;
Rosemary: “I am a lecturer at Strathmore University, and my employer offers 80% medical cover for employees, helping a great deal as we only had to pay the remaining 20%. This therefore influenced my choice in settling for Karen Hospital.”

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